Five Songs From St. Louis Musicians That Encourage Self-Reflection

October 19 is National Evaluate Your Life Day, which encourages introspection and soul-searching, and nothing will get you thinking quite like sublime songwriting that reaches out through the speakers and stirs your heart and mind. To help guide you into that contemplative place, we’ve got the perfect playlist of St. Louis artists so you can kick back with some hot tea and start considering all those forks in the road ahead.

1/ Love Song, by The Leonas
The Leonas’ newest album The Forbidden Fruit is centered entirely around the theme of feminist self-discovery. Love Song, with the flawless harmony of singers Steph Plant and Sarah Vie along with the sweet interplay of violin and acoustic guitar, highlights the pain, fascination and vastness of love.
Listen to Love Song

2/ Get Right, by Aaron Kamm and the One Drops
Mixing a delicious blend of reggae, blues and soul, Aaron Kamm and the One Drops’ lyrics on Get Right are a reminder to fight for what is right. The driving bass punctuates Kamm’s appeal that “you got to go and get right” with “that deep dark soul.”
Listen to Get Right

3/ Heavy Heart, by Brothers Lazaroff
The Brothers Lazaroff know that life can be terrifying and difficult: their album Dangerous Times is a direct response to “the insanity,” and they’ve made this album to “call on love.” The song Heavy Heart acknowledges the fear that a stormy crossroads can bring and reassures you that you are not alone in it.
Listen to Heavy Heart

4/ What’s It Like There, Tomorrow?, by Zach Schimpf
Schimpf, whose breathy but syncopated sound and poetic lyrics are reminiscent of The Postal Service, takes tomorrow by the horns with a calm wonder. “Can you find a new way with me?” he asks. “Won’t you start the new day with me?”
Listen to What’s It Like There, Tomorrow?

5/ You’re Not Getting Any Younger, by Heavy Weather
You’re Not Getting Any Younger is a nudge—a solemn reminder that life ticks ever forward and it is possible to be left behind. Move forward, the song warns, before grey hair, cold weather and an “okay” job become a binding cement. Good advice, we think.
Listen to You’re Not Getting Any Younger


Photo of The Leonas courtesy of C Bauer Photography

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