Catch The Frida Kahlo And Diego Rivera Exhibition In Kansas City Before It Closes This Sunday

By Kelly Hamilton
In Culture
Frida Kahlo Diego on my mind

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907–1954). Diego en mi pensamiento (Diego on My Mind), 1943. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

This week is your last chance to catch “Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and Masterpieces of Modern Mexico,” this summer’s featured exhibition at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. Closing this Sunday, Aug. 18, the show features more than 100 paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs never before seen in the region by Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and other Mexican artists.

The pieces in the exhibition belong to the private collection of Jacques (1909-1986) and Natasha Gelman (1911-1998), Eastern Europeans who immigrated to Mexico during World War II and became Mexican citizens and friends, patrons and collectors of influential Mexican artists of their time.

Jacques and Natasha Gelman

Jacques and Natasha Gelman. Photograph courtesy of The Vergel Foundation. Gelman Archives.

Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Gelman

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886–1957). Retrato de la Señora Natasha Gelman (Portrait of Mrs. Natasha Gelman), 1943. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

Diego Rivera Gelman portrait

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Ángel Zárraga (Mexican, 1886–1946). Retrato del Señor Jacques Gelman (Portrait of Mr. Jacques Gelman), 1945. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

Frida Kahlo is known for her masterful self-portraits (or “selfie skills,” as the Kansas City Star put it), and the exhibition features many of her most iconic, including “Diego On My Mind,”  “Self-Portrait With Monkeys” and “Self-Portrait With Necklace.” Some of Rivera’s most memorable pieces are also on display, creating an almost overwhelming experience in seeing the large number of pieces together (just imagine them hanging in your living room, as the Gelmans did until they died).

Frida Kahlo Monkeys Self Portrait

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Frida Kahlo (Mexican, 1907–1954). Autorretrato con monos (Self-Portrait with Monkeys), 1943. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Frida Kahlo, "Self Portrait With Necklace," 1933.

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Frida Kahlo, “Self Portrait With Necklace,” 1933.

Diego Rivera Gelman collection

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886–1957). Vendedora de alcatraces (Calla Lily Vendor), 1943. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

Works by almost a dozen Mexican artists are also on display, including Carlos Mérida, Cisco Jiménez and internationally renowned Betsabeé Romero, a contemporary artist from Mexico City whose work proves the vitality of Mexican art today.

Betsabeé Romero.

Betsabeé Romero (Mexican, b. 1963). Llantas para pavimento con memoria (Tires for Pavement with Memory), 2000. Carving on taxicab tires, 32 1/2 x 7 x 32 1/2 inches, each. The Vergel Foundation. © Betsabeé Romero.

Gelman collection

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Carlos Mérida (Guatemalan, 1891–1984). El mensaje (The Message), 1960. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

Gelman collection

Image courtesy of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Cisco Jiménez (Mexican, b. 1960). Códice Chafamex (Chafamex Codex) (detail), 1989-97. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is open Wednesday, 10am-4pm; Thursday, Friday, 10 am-9 pm; Saturday, 10am-5pm; Sunday, noon-5pm. Tickets to the exhibition are $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for students and are available at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art website.

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