CAM to Host Discussion on Social Unrest and Artistic Response

By Krystin Arneson
In Culture

The Contemporary Art Museum (3750 Washington Blvd.) is hosting “Creative Unrest: Artists Respond to Social Challenge,” a panel on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 7-8pm that’s free and open to everyone. Contemporary art has long been a spark and vehicle for discussions about social injustice, powerlessness and inequality, as demonstrated by Mel Chin’s powerful “Fan Club” and Mark Flood’s crackle paintings that call out the injustices of corporate America.

Mel Chin's "Maquette for Myrrha P.I.A. (Post-Industrial Age)," 1983, currently on display in Chin's "Rematch" exhibit at CAM. The original sculpture, 29 feet tall, was installed in New York City's Bryant Park as a signal of hope for the square, which was a gathering spot for the city's homeless. Photo by Amber JoIvon.

Mel Chin’s “Maquette for Myrrha P.I.A. (Post-Industrial Age),” 1983, currently on display in Chin’s “Rematch” exhibit at CAM. The original sculpture, 29 feet tall, was installed in New York City’s Bryant Park as a signal of hope for the square, which was a gathering spot for the city’s homeless. Photo by Amber JoIvon.

 

Visitors can debate Chin and Flood’s evocative works when they pay a visit to CAM, but the panel Thursday, moderated by CAM education director Tuan Nguyen and community engagement manager De Andrea Nichols, will use Ferguson as context for the discussion. Lending insights about their personal response to the events are St. Louis artists Damon Davis, Sarah Paulsen and Mallory Nezam (a guerrilla theater artist and co-organizer of #ChalkedUnarmed).

Arts community organizers Ed Reggi and Elizabeth Vega, as well as Davis (contributing his point-of-view from this angle), will also chime in to the conversation, contributing with comments and an exploration about the effectiveness of artistic response.

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