3 Things You Can't Miss At The International Photography Hall Of Fame Grand Opening

By Christopher Reilly
In Culture

The International Photography Hall of Fame, which recently relocated to St. Louis from Oklahoma City, is set to open this Friday in Grand Center at 3415 Olive Street. The museum underwent a nationwide search for a new home that included Daytona, Rochester, N.Y. and many others. St. Louis was ultimately chosen as the ideal location due to the vibrant arts culture, the St. Louis Camera Club—which boasts over 500 members—as well as close proximity to several colleges and universities that offer degrees in photography. An important part of the museum’s mission is educational outreach.

American photographer Alfred Stieglitz's "The Terminal" captures a wintry New York City urban scene in 1893. Photo from the IPHF archive.

American photographer Alfred Stieglitz’s “The Terminal” captures a wintry New York City urban scene in 1893. Photo from the IPHF archive.

At a cozy 6,100 square feet, the space isn’t large, but the content of that space is immense and often inspiring. It’s not just for hardcore photography buffs, but for anyone who loves beauty, invention and discovery, and traveling to distant worlds. ALIVE was invited to tour the new facility, and here we share three things you can expect at the IPHF Grand Opening.

Attack on Pearl Harbor (Unknown photographer) Photo from the IPHF archive.

Attack on Pearl Harbor (Unknown photographer) Photo from the IPHF archive.

Exhibit: Past, Present & Future of Nature Photography
This inaugural exhibit explores the world of nature photography as seen through a photographer’s lens. Artists on display include Hall of Famer Peter Dombrovskis, Missouri Department of Conservation photojournalist Noppadol Paothong and select images from the National Geographic Young Explorers between the ages of 20 to 28, and North American Nature Photography Association High School Scholarship Students ranging in age from 14 to 19 years old. This impressive exhibit runs until January 25, 2014.

Winston Churchill (Photographer Yousuf Karsh) Photo from the IPHF archives.

Winston Churchill (Photographer Yousuf Karsh) Photo from the IPHF archives.

Classic Photography Corner
Some of the most iconic photographs of all time are on exhibit here, a fraction of the 30,000 prints in the IPHF’s collection. Several of Eadweard Muybridge’s motion studies are on display, as well Ansel Adams’ most-sold photo of all time, “Moonrise.” The stories behind the photos are what make them resonate; for example, the ubiquitous picture of Winston Churchill was taken just after photographer Yousef Karsch snatched his cigar from his mouth. The museum’s collection boasts images from 70 Hall of Fame inductees, and organizes six or seven traveling exhibits simultaneously.

German-built Graf (Unknown photographer) Photo from the IPHF archive.

German-built Graf (Unknown photographer) Photo from the IPHF archive.

Incredible Cameras
The museum’s camera collection follows the evolution of cameras from the 1800s to present day. If it existed, chances are the museum has one, and many are fascinating examples of human ingenuity. From glass plate cameras to a replica of a Hasselblad lunar camera—a replica because the only real lunar cameras were left on the moon (not to be confused with the new lunar cameras that debuted last summer with a price tag of $7,000). The stunning craftsmanship of a specially-built Hasselblad with gold trim and components is a thing of true beauty.

The museum will be open 11am-9pm for its grand opening on Oct. 4; admission will be free for the event. For more information about the museum visit iphf.org.

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